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  1. Emmanuel says:

    Dear International Times,
    I very much enjoy browsing the archive section of your website, but recently, it’s been down at least from where I am (France). Would you mind checking if there is an issue ?
    do you need help with that ?
    best,
    Emmanuel

  2. Editor says:

    Hi Emmanuel, thanks very much for your message.
    The Archive is now back up and running.
    best wishes
    IT

    • karen moller says:

      I wrote a article about Hoppy– maybe you are interested/Users/karenmoller/Pictures/Hoppy.docxJohn Hopkins, known as Hoppy died January 2015

      Hoppy, one of the leading figures in the 1960’s counter culture, stud¬ied physics and mathemat¬ics at Cam¬bridge and worked as a physicist for the Atomic Energy Com¬mission till he fell in with the CND. Like many people in the un¬derground, he dab¬bled in almost every¬thing, including music and pub¬lishing before becoming a photogra¬pher and major force behind London’s 1960’s events. He recorded peace marches, poetry readings, “happenings”, as well as photographing leading counter-cultural figures like Yoko Ono, Barry Miles and most of the leading musicians, including the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and the Soft Machine. He was a gifted photographer and a generous person who kindly allowed me to use his photographs in my memoir Technicolor Dreamin’ the 1960’s Rainbow and Beyond.

      Hoppy helped create the counter-culture newspaper, IT, (Interna¬tional Times) a fringe arts magazine with underground news from around the world and texts by impor¬tant contemporary thinkers. Its “Censorshit” column was close to eve-ryone’s heart. The main distributor was the ever-active Barry Miles and any shop with a sign in their window that said, “You can get IT here” made that shop part of the counter-culture. The inauguration party, All-Night Rave Pop Op Costume Masque Drag Ball Et Al was held at the Chalk Farm Roundhouse, abandoned since the electrification of the trains, was a huge derelict building of ancient iron and rotting timbers. The launch, best described as co-operative anarchy, was Soft Machine’s and Pink Floyd’s first gig. They were both light-years ahead of any other groups with Soft Machine’s psychedelic-laced jazz sounds and amazing open-ended innovations often ended in an extended chant; Pink Floyd’s scary feedback sounds and repeat echoes were enhanced by the acoustics of that cavernous space. Yoko Ono staged a Fluxus-style Happen Shortly and someone made a huge, six-foot glutinous jelly in a large tub. The jelly did not quite harden and spread over the uneven floor like a creeping monster; its demolition completed when Pink Floyd accidentally backed their van over it. The horrible mess clung to my shoes as I danced, but I was having too good a time to care.

      The alternative society was at its most social, and showing off was the or¬der of the night. Many people had silver foil headdresses and re¬fraction lenses in the middle of their foreheads. There were a lot of media-familiar faces in the crowd. Paul McCartney dressed as a sheik and Mick Jagger with Marianne Faithful who was dressed in a nun’s habit that did not quite cover her bottom. She won the prize for the “shortest/barest.” Antonioni, in London to film Blow Up, seemed tired and a little bemused by it all, while Monica Vitti, in her Italian finery, looked out of place.

      Although the hippie movement was mushrooming, our newspaper went from one financial crisis to another. To solve IT’s problems, Hoppy opened the UFO Club in partnership with an oddball American and jazz fan, Joe Boyd. The site, with its polished dance floor and a revolving mirrored ball in the center, was an unlikely hippie venue, yet UFO flourished and included, at one time or another, most of the under¬ground and rock-and-roll elite. One memorable night, Jimi Hendrix played for a few minutes while the Rolling Stones watched. Whatever I might say about Hendrix phenomenal energy and passionate playing would be inadequate.

      Rumors spread that it was only a matter of time before UFO, the Roundhouse and everything the counter-culture stood for would be shut down. Without that rumor, the busting of IT’s offices by the Porn Squad who seized the money, customer lists, correspondence and carted away of the odd “dirty” book would have been incom¬prehensible, when just a few yards down the street were dozens of Soho shops selling hard-core porn. After many fruitless attempts to interest the news media in the unfair bust, Hoppy proposed a major hippie all-night event, or love-in, to put the newspaper back on its feet, The 14-Hour Technicolour Dream—a giant benefit against fuzz (police) action in the enormous Alexandra Pal¬ace, a Victorian metal and glass relic from the Great Exhibition, set in a park above North London. That event on the 29 of April 1967, promised to be a night of wonderments. In the ex¬pected atmos¬phere of good vibrations, security was lack and the peaceful tone almost erupted into flurries of viciousness, when a bunch of North London scooter boys, looking for agro attempted to overrun the gate with the avowed aim of “beating on” a few unresisting flower children. It was saved by the unexpected arrival of a crew of hippie maidens, led by Hoppy’s girlfriend, the scantily dressed Suzy Creamcheese. They smothered the scooter group with promises (probably not actually delivered) of sex and drugs beyond their wildest hopes.

      The Alexandra Pal¬ace event had everything synonymous with alternative culture—dress, sound effects, music and light shows. Everyone dressed as they pleased; the males the actual peacocks of the evening. Twin stages had been erected at the opposite ends of the hall and separate groups played simultaneously. Lights hung on a suspension bridge between the two stages were attached at mid-point to a rented fairground 30-foot helter-skelter slide that offered free rides to anyone with the courage to climb to the top and slide down that shaky structure. In that central area, under that helter skelter the random blend of the two opposing bands met and produced a throbbing and irregular heartbeat. I couldn’t help thinking that John Cage would have appreciated that weird, curious composition of accidental and totally arbitrary sounds. John Lennon obviously thought the same. He suddenly appeared among the crowd with John Dunbar from the Indica Gallery. “Hi, man!” my boyfriend greeted them. “Glad you guys could make it.” Dunbar tugged at his military style jacket as if it made him uncomfortable. “Yeah, far out,” he said. “We seen them filming this Technicolour Dream on TV and said fuck it, let’s go.” Lennon stopped and put his hand up as if to say wait. He moved back and then slowly forward, looking quite pensive. “Did you hear that?” he asked. He turned and walked back through the audio fusion zone created by those two opposing bands. He smiled and said, “Far fucking out.” Dunbar got out some grass and was about to roll a joint when a guy staggered toward him wearing a headband around his shoulder-length hair and oversized embroidered jeans. “Hey, man!” he shouted. “You’re draggin’, man. Try the banana skins?” Ken Kelsey had started a new hippie craze, claiming banana skins, properly prepared, and smoked, gave an incredible hallucino¬genic high. Dunbar laughed and pointed to the people squatting in groups under a sort of plastic igloo filled with smoke. “Forget it, man, the highs not worth the fucking smell.”

      At the far end of the hall, Soft Machine, soon to disappear from the music scene, had set up their equipment. Dressed in outlandish and conflicting outfits of miner’s helmets, Dr. Strange capes, and exaggerated makeup, their presentation made few concessions, their music as innovative as ever. The Pretty Things bashed out their incongruous sounds and the amazing Arthur Brown, with his white soul voice, whipped up the crowd with an inspiring performance God of Hellfire. The showstopper by The Purple Gang, should have made rock history with their hippie an¬them, Granny Takes a Trip, instead, they drifted into obscurity. Pink Floyd, their special effects rec¬reating an atmosphere of being stoned had the honor of closing the event. The atmosphere was electric as we joined hands with our neighbors, Pink Floyd hitting full orbital momentum with Astronomy Domine just as the first rays of the sun entered the enormous rose window.

      IT described the event as “full of euphoric transcendence and trust between strangers.” Financially speaking, it was more successful than anyone could have imag¬ined and should have raised over 10,000 pounds, had the money not disappeared into unknown pockets. So much for trust between ticket sellers and group unity. I only found out later that Hoppy created that magnificent get-together while out on bail from a drug charge. Six months earlier, the Drug Squad had raided his flat and found a small quantity of marijuana. No one considered it serious till Hoppy insisted in court that marijuana was harmless. The judge called him “a drug pest” and jailed him for nine months. We were devastated. Without Hoppy, Swinging London might never have happened, at least not in the way it did. With his passing he will be greatly missed.
      Karen Moller
      Author of Technicolor Dreamin’ the 1960’s Rainbow and Beyond
      In Her Own Fashion
      Forbidden Games

      • Thank you so much for your story, fragments of info I hear from different sources add to my own recollections. Such magic in such squalor, I lay amongst a pile of liter looking up at the ceiling as Pink Floyd played… a lot of people split in the night, poor fools!

      • Charlotte Roundhouse says:

        Hello Karen,
        I really enjoyed reading your article about Hoppy. My name is Charlotte and I work at the Roundhouse – we are working on a website that is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the venue. The website is going to be an official and personal history of the venue and we are curating people’s Roundhouse memories and stories. We really want to include as many memories and anecdotes from that opening night in 1966 with the International Times launch, so it would be wonderful to hear more of your memories of that night and any other nights you spent there.
        Do let me know,
        Very best
        Charlotte

    • Charlotte Roundhouse says:

      Hello Editor,
      I hope you’re well. My name is Charlotte and I work at the Roundhouse. I am working on a 50th anniversary website which is celebrating the rich history of the venue and arts space. The launch of your newspaper was our first ever event and so it’s a really important part of our history. I wanted to get in contact to ask whether you might be happy to share any memories or information that you might have about the launch party of your newspaper at the Roundhouse (or Centre 42 as it was then).
      If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask
      Hope to hear from you soon,
      Charlotte

  3. Alberto says:

    Hey Niall, I’m just wondering what happened to those Open Letters to Artangel you wrote?
    They are not turning up in the searches anymore…

    An avid reader
    A

  4. Francesca says:

    I would be interested in contacting the blog administrator with a question about the International Times archive. Would it be possible to send me an email contact?

    Many thanks, Francesca

    • julian says:

      i used to hang out at Chepstow Villas in the mid 70s (76/77), i had a friend working in IT, Nigel, although i have lost touch over the years and life was very much a blur in those days. recently i found a couple of original artworks which m ust be from an issue of IT at the time. I trawled through the archives but couldn’t find it. If i email JPEGs to you could you give them to your archivist and see if they can link them? I want to frame them but i also want to specify the issue and page No etc.

      thanks

  5. Caroline says:

    I would be interested in contacting your permission syndication. We would like to use the International Times as a props for a serie TV . Would it be possible to send me an email contact as soon as possible?

    Many thanks, Caroline

  6. Nick spurrier says:

    Do you have an archive copy of the BIT guide “Overland through Africa” circa 1974/75 that can be scanned.

  7. Do you know of any way to purchase back issues of printed IT? It does appear that IT is no longer printed, correct?

  8. Piero Maha Luni says:

    Dear Editor, In a lapse of time between October 1967 and March 1968 I was selling IT just out of the tube stations, mainly Notting Hill, Sloane square, Earl’s Court etc. I was wondering: do I deserve something from this? Ah! When I was selling IT in Sloane square I sold two copies to poor Joe Cocker, who just left us. RIP.

  9. Hello – I have been searching for a facebook group or a website that might be interested – now I have found your site. I took a few photographs inside the IT offices on 9thApril 1969. I think it was in Endell Street then. I wonder if you would be interested in seeing these? Please let me know. Cheers, Joss

  10. José Sousa says:

    Good morning

    We’re a new band.
    Hope you enjoy our music.

    Best compliments

    youtube.com/user/bbuteo

  11. Ellie says:

    Hi there, I’m a Masters History and Culture of Fashion student hoping to use some International Times material in my forthcoming dissertation project and I was wondering where the archive is currently being held? I believe it was with the Idea Generation Galley, which has sadly now closed… Thanks! Ellie

  12. Dear Editor,

    I wonder if you might be able to help me, I’m looking to reproduce some materials of ‘IT’ in a book I’m working on. Is there someone I could contact directly to discuss this?
    With best wishes,
    Joanna

  13. Hey there International Times,

    We from Blackjack Illuminist (based in the outskirts of Berlin) release Shoegaze/Ambient/Drone/Postrock/Pop records, CDs and tapes on a DIY basis.
    You’re looking for new sounds? Here we go: We would like to present to you our newest band Feverdreamt. We think you might like it, because it’s unusual enough to keep indie/drone all fresh and edgy. We’ve heard enough Shoegaze and Ambient which is never leaving the safe side.
    Feverdreamt from Berlin make gloomy melancholic, Oriental Drone Kraut Rock with Shoegazey/Post Rock guitars and cinemascope dramatic violins, yet it may also be true if you saw a certain folky Dream Pop attitude in some of the songs. Whatever you want to call it, it is somewhere in between sleeping and being awake, hence, the band’s name. The lyrics are sung in its own language: Terbansk.
    Now, the debut album was just released on tape and CD.
    To download it for free please go to the following address and redeem your code (rw45-hdhn …. okay, let’s provide you with some more as this is a public guest book, ha! aspb-vcpe, and one more: hffm-chev):

    http://blackjackilluministrecords.bandcamp.com/yum

    If you want to immediately listen to a song please check out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkZTzRuzrDA

    It would make us very happy, if you had fun with Feverdreamt’s album. However, we would be forever grateful if you wrote a some sentences about the album. If you need more (e.g. pictures) don’t hesitate to get back at us.

    Thanks a lot for your time, we’re looking forward to hearing from you.

    Cheers,
    Alex

  14. Nico has died on the 18th of July 1988 in Ibiza 27 years ago. But nevertheless life keeps going on and Nico’s work still leaves traces.
    So I felt it is about time to share my memories about my life with Nico.
    This very personal story contains a lot of photos (some of them unpublished) and very rare private letters of Nico.

    Here is the link:http://www.amazon.com/Nico-Shadow-Goddess-Lutz-Graf-Ulbrich-ebook/dp/B011WIJ1W6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1437208620&sr=8-1&keywords=nico+in+the+shadow&pebp=1437208623841&perid=0FYESB3FYDM0JKQNMZR8

    an free e-reader for pc, mac and smartphone is available at amazon kindle

    all the best

    Lutz Graf-Ulbrich
    guitar player, lover and friend of Nico’s

    http://www.luul.de
    http://www.facebook.com/LuulFanPage

  15. Judy Love says:

    Heavens to betsy! (I have no idea what it means, but does work as an exclamation.) I thought IT was long gone, but here it is in my Twitter box. I used to sell IT (newspapers) on Baker Street, London in 1969. From there I went to Time Out when it was only available in London and just gone weekly. I wish you well and will definitely be checking out your articles in the future.

  16. Rob Baker says:

    Dear Editor – I’d like to feature the Angry Brigade communique about the Spanish Embassy (featured in December 1970) in a book I’m writing. One chapter is about the 1970 Miss World contest and I write a potted history of the Angry Brigade. Would this be possible do you think?

    Thank you,

    Rob

  17. Devon says:

    I recently aquired what I believe is the camera of the late Hoppy Hopkins, the co-founder of IT. And was wondering if you good people from IT would like to have a look at it

  18. Ben says:

    Just wondering if you ever take article submissions or is all content done in house? If someone had an article suggestion that could fit the ethos of magazine would it be looked at?

  19. col says:

    Hi All, is there any particular reasons for IT being based in Italy? ♒

  20. chrissy says:

    Trying to submit none of the email links work 🙁

  21. john says:

    dear…end of 1969…1970 i presume..you’re mag released the historic Dylan boot ‘great white wonder’.
    did that record came with any preticulair magazine or was it available on its own.
    on ebay there is now a copy for sale..white covered with the legendary It logo sticker.
    i hope you can help me out.
    with regards and good luck.
    John

  22. chrissy says:

    Being neutered by cyberspace, the emails aren’t working and I so much want to be included in this wonder cool rag spitting on conformity and revealing all hypocrisy let me submit stop the elitist bull shit! Don’t be a stuck up press excluding those with no means of redress save for the pen the pen the pen .

    Yep basically it’s not working xo

  23. Laufi says:

    Hello, I’m from Germany and travelled the English Free Festivals a lot from 1975 – 1979. While in London I lived with the people from BIT – Information Service and got to know IT through them. Sold IT on the streets and festivals, great fun! I still have plenty of printed issues. Great that you are still online!! Holy Flips, Laufi

  24. Jechusvi says:

    Hello,

    I discovered the printed version recently in a bookshop in london, and really loved it, i went to the same place to get the issu number two, but the didn´t have it and they don´t know how to get it, I was wondering if there is any place to buy it, or the get it send to my house.

    Thanks very much

  25. Dear Sir or Madame,

    We’re Atom Heart, a hard rock band from Poland and we’ve just released debut EP. We would like to ask if you would be interested in writing a review of our album? Our music can be found at https://atomheartband.bandcamp.com/album/into-the-light I can also send you music in .mp3 or .wav if you prefer.

    Atom Heart has formed a year ago and since then the band has managed to play around 40 concerts in Poland and few in Berlin. The biggest band’s achievement is mentioned, debut EP as well as playing at second biggest Polish student festival – Juwenalia PW 2016.

    Hope to hear from you,
    All best,
    Kamil

  26. bing selfish says:

    Check this out:
    I am you and you are me
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCRY65Grg6M

  27. Marie says:

    Hi,

    I’m a French journalist and I’m doing a work for my school of journalism. I would like to comment the photo “No Borders” (the guy in the frontier with the hamac) and just would like to check if the author of this photography is Heathcote Williams. As a matter of fact, the photo is on many websites and blogs and it’s kind of confuse about the sources. I saw that you were the first one to publish it and just wanted to make sure about the sources.
    Thank you very much for your answer!
    Cheers,
    Marie

  28. Andy says:

    Hi there

    I’m wondering if you have any contacts to where I could buy a back copy. Looking for a good quality issue 100. Is this something you can help me with?

  29. M.Casey says:

    What does the B stand for in BIT?

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